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History & Heritage - History

History & Heritage

Welcome to the Scotland School and find out more about the history and heritage of the nation from a wide range of in-depth articles that have appeared in Scotland Magazine over the last decade.

Categories

History

A bloody end to an uprising
Culloden stands out as a defining moment in Scottish history. James Irvine Robertson looks back

January 2004, Issue 12, page 20

A call to arms
Heraldry was the way you identified yourself in battle. James Irvine Robertson looks at its significance

April 2005, Issue 20, page 20

A curious tale
Heidi Soholt looks at an elaborate joke that has persisted the test of time.

December 2009, Issue 48, page 22

A history pursued religiously
Unsurprisingly for a country where religion has meant so much, Scotland has some stunning churches. David Gordan visits some of them

July 2004, Issue 15, page 20

A lament for Killicrankie
It was one of Scotland's bloodiest conflicts but Killicrankie is often forgotten today. James Irvine Robertson reports

February 2006, Issue 25, page 20

A serious and thoughtful monarch
James, son of Mary, Queen of Scots was the first monarch to rule both Scotland and England. And he didn't do a bad job. James Irvine Robertson reports.

April 2008, Issue 38, page 38

A tale of two kingdoms
James Irvine Robertson delves deep in to history to explain the fundamental cultural divisions of Scotland

August 2005, Issue 22, page 20

A Victorian playground
In the middle of the 19th century, Edinburgh residents made way for The Royal Patent Gymnasium, an eccentric recreational resort. Jack Gillon takes us back.

August 2009, Issue 46, page 50

Battlefields and beauty spots
David Gordan highlights some of Scotland's most famous battle sites

September 2004, Issue 16, page 28

Border patrol
Mark Nicholls looks at the King's Own Scottish Borderers and its heartland where Scotland and England meet

August 2005, Issue 22, page 62

Capital's military connection
In the final part of our series on Scotland's army regiments, Mark Nicholls looks at the Edinburgh-based Royal Scots, the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and the role of the Scots Guards

January 2006, Issue 24, page 62

Changing of the guards for the Scottish regiments
Scotland's historic infantry regiments are to undergo a major re-organisation. As part of our ongoing series looking at Scotland's regiments, Mark Nicholls examines the proposal and its impact on thei...

March 2005, Issue 19, page 62

Christian Shaw and the witches
James Irvine Robertson brings to light the story of a little girl and Scotland's very own witch trials

June 2008, Issue 39, page 38

Duke of Cumberland and the ‘45
James Irvine Robertson looks at the legacy of ‘Butcher' Cumberland and the Rising of 1745.

December 2008, Issue 42, page 38

Dumfries & Galloway
Broadcaster and writer Fiona Armstrong, who lives and works on the English border, takes a look at the fascination of this unspoiled and magnificent part of the country

June 2002, Issue 2, page 46

Edinburgh's great beast
Rioting in 18th century Edinburgh was once a common occurence. James Irvine Robertson looks at why.

August 2009, Issue 46, page 43

Family matters
We look at the colourful world of heraldry.

December 2009, Issue 48, page 38

Famous across the world
In our continuing series on the great Scottish regiments, Mark Nicholls looks at the origins of the Black Watch and the part of Scotland it calls its own

April 2005, Issue 20, page 56

Frying tonight
James Carron meets the man who brought chips to Scotland.

February 2010, Issue 49, page 68

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July 2003, Issue 9, page 74

Highlands and lowlifes
The widespread eviction of tenant crofters in the Scottish highlands in the late 18th and 19th centuries transformed the landscape. James Irvine Robertson examines the consequences

July 2002, Issue 3, page 36

Holding the line
We look at the battle of Dunkeld.

October 2009, Issue 47, page 38

In search of the Empress
Heidi Scholt investigates the case of Helen Gloag.

April 2010, Issue 50, page 56

Islands of lost souls
Scotland has numerous islands. Some of them are inhabited, others are deserted. More than 80 of them used to have inhabitants, but the locals left for several different reasons. Marieke McBean investi...

August 2007, Issue 34, page 60

James II
James Irvine Robertson looks at the life of James II and his struggle to keep his crown.

February 2009, Issue 43, page 38

Jute City
Scotland's fourth city was built largely on the Jute industry, a natural fibre also known as hessian or burlap. Gavin D Smith reports.

April 2008, Issue 38, page 68

Leith's Templars
We investigate Scotland's Templars and their association with Leith.

October 2009, Issue 47, page 22

Life in a country house
Charles Douglas visits Pollok House, a Georgian mansion at the heart of a Glasgow country park.

February 2009, Issue 43, page 14

Lord George and the last siege in Britain
James Irvine Robertson looks at one of Scotland's greatest military leaders

April 2007, Issue 32, page 38

Many strings to their bows
Scots grandees have a number of ceremonial roles based on history. One of the most prestigious is based around its pursuit of fine archery. James Irvine Robertson reports

October 2005, Issue 23, page 20

Mary Queen of Scots
MARY STEWART WAS BORN INTO CONFLICT AND DIED AS A TRAGIC RESULT OF IT. JAMES IRVINE-ROBERTSON ON ONE OF SCOTLAND'S BEST-KNOWN MONARCHS

February 2003, Issue 6, page 30

Meet the Romans
Ian R Mitchell looks at where you can find traces of the Roman invasions of Caledonia, the only territory their legions failed to conquer

December 2006, Issue 30, page 24

Monarchs of the Glen
The British monarchy is whee it isbecause of its Scottish roots. A look back in time by Charles Douglas

July 2002, Issue 3, page 28

Murder most horrid
The Appin Murder still resonates more than 250 years after it happened. James Irvine Robertson explains why

July 2005, Issue 21, page 20

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May 2003, Issue 8, page 74

No compromise
James Irvine Robertson on the struggles of the Covenanters

November 2004, Issue 17, page 24

On the hunt for history
Many of Scotland's historical sites are worth a visit, but what if you had to pick a select few? David Gordon tries to do just that

May 2004, Issue 14, page 32

On the war path
Sally Toms picks out a few places to visit in connection with World War II

February 2007, Issue 31, page 58

One of our greatest 'whodunnits'
James Irvine Robertson looks at the strange case of Lord Darnley - King Henry - who was a victim of political intrigue and murder

May 2004, Issue 14, page 20

Opportunity Knox
JAMES IRVINE-ROBERTSON LOOKS AT HOW THE REFORMATION TOOK SHAPE IN SCOTLAND

September 2003, Issue 10, page 20

Pirates of the Atlantic
Scotland's a long way from the Caribbean glamour of Jack Sparrow and crew. But as Dominic Roskrow reports, it's still well and truly on the pirate map.

December 2007, Issue 36, page 22

Roman holiday
James Irvine Robertson asks the searching question: 'What have the Romans ever done for us?'

March 2002, Issue 1, page 38

Sacred Scotland
There are numerous spiritual sites around Scotland, both ancient and modern. Liz Pickering looks at their significance.

October 2008, Issue 41, page 42

Saints & Sinners
Liz Pickering looks at some of the more colourful characters in Scottish history.

April 2010, Issue 50, page 42

Scotland's very own gold rush
Nick Todd reveals the history of Scotland's gold, and where to find it today.

December 2007, Issue 36, page 42

Seeds of the nation
James Irvine-Robertson wades into the ‘exceedingly murky' history of the pictish peoples, direct predecessors of the men and women who united scotland as a nation

September 2002, Issue 4, page 34

Set for the history books
In the latest in our series on the Scottish regiments, Mark Nicholls looks at the Royal Highland Fusiliers and Glasgow, the vibrant city where it still recruits many of its soldiers

October 2005, Issue 23, page 65

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July 2003, Issue 9, page 20

Shrouded in mystery and farce...
The Gowrie Conspiracy is one of the stranger incidents in Scottish history. James Irvine Robertson tries to make sense of the event, which happened more than 400 years ago

September 2004, Issue 16, page 20

Sinclair's snapshot of a nation
James Irvine Robertson on Sir John Sinclair and The Statistical Account of Scotland

January 2005, Issue 18, page 20

Smuggling
It's been called the national vice of Scotland, and smuggling is ingrained in the country's history. Dominic Roskrow seeks out some smuggling hotspots

April 2007, Issue 32, page 68

Soldiers made of Stirling stuff
The Scottish army regiments have a long and distinguished history. Mark Nicholls looks at the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the diverse attractions that lie in the regiment's traditional recru...

November 2004, Issue 17, page 56

That brawling, boisterous Scottish wench
Annette Harrower-Gray looks at the amazing tale of Black Agnes, Countess of Moray.

February 2009, Issue 43, page 21

The Act of Union
This year marks the 300th anniversary of the union between Scotland and England. Paul Riddell looks at where events unfolded

June 2007, Issue 33, page 42

The battle of Stirling Bridge
James Irvine Robertson describes the battle of Stirling Bridge and Wallace's legendary defeat over the English

August 2007, Issue 34, page 38

The Darien disaster
James Irvine Robertson looks at one of the worst misjudgements in Scotland's commercial and economic history

July 2004, Issue 15, page 24

The devil and the deep blue sea
Gavin D Smith explores Scotland's long association with the sea

June 2007, Issue 33, page 24

The Douglas Cause
James Irvine Robertson investigates a nation-gripping court case.

April 2010, Issue 50, page 38

The Earls of Argyll
James Irvine Robertson looks at the dramatic history of the noble Campbells

November 2007, Issue 35, page 38

The first Highland charge
This issue, James Irvine Robertson looks at the bloody history that surrounds Sir David Lindsay, 1st Earl of Crawford, and the battle at Glasclune

June 2007, Issue 33, page 38

The great departure
During the 18th century, thousands of Scots left their homeland for a new life in America. James Irvine Robertson finds out why.

December 2007, Issue 36, page 38

The greatest fraud of all?
James Irvine Robertsonon the strange but highly lucrative case of James Macpherson

June 2006, Issue 27, page 20

The Highland Host
James Irvine Robertson looks at a nasty period in rebellion suppression.

February 2010, Issue 49, page 38

The Lady of Lawers
James Irvine Robertson on a prophet with a pretty good track record

April 2006, Issue 26, page 20

The life of King James IV
This issue, James Irvine Robertson looks at the history of James IV, the man responsible for the creation of the Kingdom of Scotland

February 2007, Issue 31, page 38

The Lyon King
Robin Blair, controversial new Lord Lyon King of Arms talks to Scotland Magazine. Words and pictures by James Carney

July 2002, Issue 3, page 56

The Massacre of Glencoe
MUCH HAS BEEN WRITTEN AND SAID ABOUT GLENCOE BUT WHAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED? JAMES IRVINE ROBERTSON TRIES TO CUT THROUGH THE MYTHS

November 2003, Issue 11, page 20

The most famous Fillan
There have been 16 Saint Fillans. James Irvine Robertson recalls the eighth century one

January 2006, Issue 24, page 20

The murder of King James 1
James Irvine Robertson looks at the untimely death of a Stewart king.

October 2008, Issue 41, page 38

The Patriot
NEIL GUNN EXAMINES THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ANDREW FLETCHER, WHO FOUGHT FOR SCOTTISH DEMOCRACY AND INDEPENDENCE

March 2003, Issue 7, page 36

The Rough Wooing
James Irvine Robertson delves into the history of a rough royal courtship.

August 2008, Issue 40, page 39

The Stone of Destiny
James Irvine Robertson turns his attention to the most contested artefact in Scottish history.

March 2008, Issue 37, page 40

The Ulster Scots
James Irvine Robertson considers the Scots that emigrated to Ireland, and from there the United States.

June 2009, Issue 45, page 38

The wild world of the original cowboys
Cattle droving was a core part of Highland life and drovers lived a tough and hardy lifestyle. James Irvine Robertson reports

March 2005, Issue 19, page 20

Those who lay beneath us
You don't normally associate mummies – the wrapped up kind – with Scotland. But the ones at Cladh Hallan are worth investigating

July 2005, Issue 21, page 28

Totally torn in two
The 'disruption' saw Scotland's Kirk split for more than 85 years. James Irvine Robertson explains why it happened.

March 2004, Issue 13, page 20

Tough, loyal and proud
In the second in our series looking at Scotland's army regiments, we focus on The Highlanders, the proud descendants of five famous Scottish fighting units. As Mark Nicholls discovered, they recruit o...

January 2005, Issue 18, page 44

Tragedy at sea
The sinking of the HM Iolaire in 1919 was the worst peacetime disaster in British history. James Irvine Robertson looks at what happened on that fateful day.

April 2009, Issue 44, page 39

Under the great dictator
This issue James Irvine Robertson looks at a dark chapter of Scotland's history

October 2006, Issue 29, page 20

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May 2003, Issue 8, page 24

Walking with witches
Annette Harrower-Grey leads us on a historic tour of the Fife coast, setting for some dramatic events in the 17th and 18th centuries.

April 2009, Issue 44, page 68

War of Independence
JAMES IRVINE-ROBERTSON LOOKS AT THE WARS OF INDEPENDENCE WHICH FINALLY SAW AN END TO THREATS ON SCOTLAND'S NATIONHOOD

November 2002, Issue 5, page 30

What Flora did next
Whatever happened to Flora Macdonald, the woman who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie to escape from the British? Jackie Cosh reports

August 2005, Issue 22, page 48

When the saints came marching in
Gilly Pickup looks at a few places connected with Scotland's saints

April 2007, Issue 32, page 54

When zeppelins rained terror
In 1916 zeppelin airships appeared in the sky above Edinburgh and began an air raid that the city was not prepare for. Gordon Casely reports.

June 2009, Issue 45, page 34

Wild Celts from the North
Pictish influence can be felt all over the north and east of Scotland. But who were they? Roger McCann reports

January 2005, Issue 18, page 24

Written in the blood (Auld Alliance)
The Auld Alliance was an ancient series of treaties that allied Scotland and France against their mutual enemy. James Irvine Robertson reports

December 2006, Issue 30, page 42