Not a member?
Register and login now.

Issue 72 - Aberdeen and the Grampians

Scotland Magazine Issue 72
December 2013

 

This article is 3 years old and some information provided may be time sensitive. Please check all details of events, tours, opening times and other information before travelling or making arrangements.

Copyright Scotland Magazine © 1999-2017. All rights reserved. To use or reproduce part or all of this article please contact us for details of how you can do so legally.

Aberdeen and the Grampians

Your guide to the region

The City of Aberdeen, which hugs the north east coast of Grampian Region, is the third largest metropolis in Scotland, an independently minded, economically thriving hub of culture and business fuelled by its harbour and the oil and trading links of the North Sea. The city's two universities, The University of Aberdeen, founded in 1495, and The Robert Gordon University, awarded its status in 1992, make Aberdeen the educational centre of the north-east. Aberdeen's seaport is the largest in the north east, and Aberdeen Heliport is one of the busiest commercial helicoptor bases in the world. From the mid-eighteenth century, the international demand for granite quarried at Rubislaw became Aberdeen's leading industry. Both London Bridge and Waterloo Bridge were constructed of it, and its impressive solidity and grandeur can be witnessed in the buildings in the centre of Aberdeen itself. Over the centuries, shipbuilding developed alongside a fishing industry, and Aberdeen became famous for its sharp-bowed “clipper” ships designed for the China Seas and for the transportation of emigrants to Australia. In the latter part of twentieth century, however, the discovery of substantial oil deposits lying deep in the cold waters of the North Sea was to completely regenerate the city and bring enormous prosperity to the region, alongside high technology developments in the electronics design and development industry.

The City of Aberdeen, which hugs the north east coast of Grampian Region, is the third largest metropolis in Scotland, an independently minded, economically thriving hub of culture and business fuelled by its harbour and the oil and trading links of the North Sea. The city's two universities, The University of Aberdeen, founded in 1495, and The Robert Gordon University, awarded its status in 1992, make Aberdeen the educational centre of the north-east. Aberdeen's seaport is the largest in the north east, and Aberdeen Heliport is one of the busiest commercial helicoptor bases in the world. From the mid-eighteenth century, the international demand for granite quarried at Rubislaw became Aberdeen's leading industry. Both London Bridge and Waterloo Bridge were constructed of it, and its impressive solidity and grandeur can be witnessed in the buildings in the centre of Aberdeen itself. Over the centuries, shipbuilding developed alongside a fishing industry, and Aberdeen became famous for its sharp-bowed “clipper” ships designed for the China Seas and for the transportation of emigrants to Australia. In the latter part of twentieth century, however, the discovery of substantial oil deposits lying deep in the cold waters of the North Sea was to completely regenerate the city and bring enormous prosperity to the region, alongside high technology developments in the electronics design and development industry.